Annual report pursuant to Section 13 and 15(d)

Significant Accounting Policies

v3.21.1
Significant Accounting Policies
12 Months Ended
Dec. 31, 2020
Accounting Policies [Abstract]  
Significant Accounting Policies

Note 3 – Significant Accounting Policies

 

Basis of Presentation and Principles of Consolidation

 

The accompanying consolidated financial statements have been derived from the accounting records of AESE and its consolidated subsidiaries. All significant intercompany balances have been eliminated in the consolidated financial statements. The consolidated financial statements have been prepared in accordance with U.S. GAAP and pursuant to the accounting rules and regulations of the United States Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”). Expenses that the Former Parent incurred on behalf of WPT and Allied Esports prior to the Merger were allocated to each entity using specific identification.

 

Use of Estimates

 

Preparation of financial statements in conformity with U.S. GAAP requires management to make estimates, judgments and assumptions that affect the reported amounts of assets, liabilities, revenues and expenses, together with amounts disclosed in the related notes to the financial statements. The Company’s significant estimates used in these financial statements include, but are not limited to, the valuation and carrying amount of goodwill and other intangible assets, accounts receivable reserves, the valuation of investments, stock-based compensation, warrants and deferred tax assets, as well as the recoverability and useful lives of long-lived assets, including intangible assets, property and equipment and deferred production costs. Certain of the Company’s estimates could be affected by external conditions, including those unique to the Company and general economic conditions. It is reasonably possible that these external factors could have an effect on the Company’s estimates and could cause actual results to differ from those estimates.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

All short-term investments of the Company that have a maturity of three months or less when purchased are considered to be cash equivalents. There were no cash equivalents as of December 31, 2020 or 2019.

 

Restricted Cash

 

Restricted cash consists of cash held in an escrow account to be utilized for various approved strategic initiatives and esports event programs pursuant to an agreement with Brookfield Property Partners. See Note 14 – Commitments and Contingencies, Investment Agreements.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable are carried at their contractual amounts. Management establishes an allowance for doubtful accounts based on its historic loss experience and current economic conditions. Losses are charged to the allowance when management deems further collection efforts will not produce additional recoveries. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, there was no bad debt allowance.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost, net of accumulated depreciation using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives once the asset is placed in service. Leasehold improvements are amortized over the lesser of (a) the useful life of the asset; or (b) the remaining lease term (including renewal periods that are reasonably assured). Expenditures for maintenance and repairs, which do not extend the economic useful life of the related assets, are charged to operations as incurred, and expenditures which extend the economic life are capitalized. When assets are retired or otherwise disposed of, the costs and related accumulated depreciation or amortization are removed from the accounts and any gain or loss on disposal is recognized in the statement of operations for the respective period.

 

The estimated useful lives of property and equipment are as follows:

 

Computer equipment   3 - 5 years
Production equipment   5 years
Furniture and Fixtures   3 - 5 years
Software   1 - 5 years
Gaming Truck   5 years
Leasehold Improvements   10 years

 

Intangible Assets and Goodwill

 

The Company’s intangible assets consist of the Allied Esports trademarks, which are being amortized over a useful life of 10 years. Intangible assets with indefinite lives are not amortized but are evaluated at least annually for impairment and more often whenever changes in facts and circumstances may indicate that the carrying value may not be recoverable.

 

Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

 

The Company reviews for the impairment of long-lived assets whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of an asset may not be recoverable. The Company measures the carrying amount of the asset against the estimated undiscounted future cash flows associated with it. Should the sum of the expected future net cash flows be less than the carrying value of the asset being evaluated, an impairment loss would be recognized for the amount by which the carrying value of the asset exceeds its fair value. The evaluation of asset impairment requires the Company to make assumptions about future cash flows over the life of the asset being evaluated. These assumptions require significant judgment and actual results may differ from assumed and estimated amounts.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company recognized an impairment of $6,138,631 and $600,000, respectively related to certain investments, $5,595,557 and $0, respectively, related to property and equipment. and during the year ended December 31, 2019 the Company recognized impairment expense of $330,340 related to deferred production costs, due to management’s determination that the future cash flows from these assets are not expected to be sufficient to recover their carrying value.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

The Company measures the fair value of financial assets and liabilities based on the guidance of ASC 820 “Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures” (“ASC 820”).

 

ASC 820 defines fair value as the exchange price that would be received for an asset or paid to transfer a liability (an exit price) in the principal or most advantageous market for the asset or liability in an orderly transaction between market participants on the measurement date. ASC 820 also establishes a fair value hierarchy, which requires an entity to maximize the use of observable inputs and minimize the use of unobservable inputs when measuring fair value. ASC 820 describes three levels of inputs that may be used to measure fair value:

 

Level 1 - quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities.

 

Level 2 - quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets or inputs that are observable.

 

Level 3 - inputs that are unobservable (for example, cash flow modeling inputs based on assumptions).

 

The carrying amounts of the Company’s financial instruments, such as accounts receivable, accounts payable and accrued liabilities approximate fair value due to the short-term nature of these instruments. The Company’s convertible debt approximates fair value due to its short-term nature and market rate of interest.

 

Nonrecurring Fair Value Measurements

 

Certain nonfinancial assets and liabilities are measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis and are subject to fair value adjustments in certain circumstances, such as when there is evidence of impairment. These fair value measurements are categorized within level 3 of the fair value hierarchy.

 

The Company periodically evaluates the carrying value of long-lived assets to be held and used when events or circumstances warrant such a review. Fair value is determined primarily using anticipated cash flows assumed by a market participant discounted at a rate commensurate with the risk involved or in the case of nonfinancial assets or liabilities. See “Impairment of Long-Lived Assets”, above.

 

Income Taxes

 

The Company recognizes deferred tax assets and liabilities for the expected future tax consequences of items that have been included in the financial statements or tax returns. Under this method, deferred tax assets and liabilities are based on the differences between the financial statement and tax bases of assets and liabilities using enacted tax rates in effect for the year in which the differences are expected to reverse. Deferred tax assets are reduced by a valuation allowance to the extent management concludes it is more likely than not that the assets will not be realized. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in the statements of operations in the period that includes the enactment date.

 

The Company recognizes the tax benefit from an uncertain income tax position only if it is more likely than not that the tax position will be sustained on examination by the taxing authorities, based on the technical merits of the position. The tax benefits recognized in the financial statements from such a position should be measured based on the largest benefit that has a greater than 50% likelihood of being realized upon ultimate settlement by examining taxing authorities.

 

The Company’s policy is to recognize interest and penalties accrued on uncertain income tax positions in interest expense in the Company’s statements of operations. As of December 31, 2020 and 2019, the Company had no liability for unrecognized tax benefits. The Company does not expect the unrecognized tax benefits to change significantly over the next 12 months.

 

Commitments and Contingencies

 

Liabilities for loss contingencies arising from claims, assessments, litigation, fines and penalties and other sources are recorded when it is probable that a liability has been incurred and the amount of the assessment can be reasonably estimated.

 

Net Loss per Common Share

 

Basic loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss attributable to the Company by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding during the period. Diluted loss per common share is computed by dividing net loss attributable to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding, plus the impact of common shares, if dilutive, resulting from the exercise of outstanding stock options and warrants and the conversion of convertible instruments.

 

The following securities are excluded from the calculation of weighted average dilutive common shares because their inclusion would have been anti-dilutive:

 

    December 31,  
    2020     2019  
Restricted common shares     199,143      
-
 
Options     2,430,000       2,480,000  
Warrants     20,091,549       18,637,003  
Convertible debt     439,811 (1)      1,647,058  
Equity purchase options     600,000       600,000  
Contingent consideration shares     269,231       3,846,153  
      24,029,734       27,210,214  

(1)  Common stock equivalents associated with convertible debt were calculated based on the fixed conversion price in effect for voluntary holder conversions; however, for certain convertible notes there is a variable conversion price in effect under certain scenarios that is equal to 87% of lowest daily volume weighted average price over the prior ten days, subject to a $0.734 floor price. If the applicable convertible note principal and guaranteed interest were all converted at the floor price, the potentially dilutive shares related to convertible debt would be 1,154,789 shares.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

On January 1, 2019, the Company adopted ASC Topic 606, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers” (“ASC 606”). The core principle of ASC 606 requires that an entity recognize revenue to depict the transfer of promised goods or services to customers in an amount that reflects the consideration to which the company expects to be entitled in exchange for those goods or services. ASC 606 defines a five-step process to achieve this core principle and, in doing so, it is possible more judgment and estimates may be required within the revenue recognition process than required under previous guidance, including identifying performance obligations in the contract, estimating the amount of variable consideration to include in the transaction price and allocating the transaction price to each separate performance obligation.

 

The Company adopted ASC 606 for all applicable contracts using the modified retrospective method, which would have required a cumulative-effect adjustment, if any, as of the date of adoption. The adoption of ASC 606 did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements as of the date of adoption. As a result, a cumulative-effect adjustment was not required.

 

To determine the proper revenue recognition method, the Company evaluates each of its contractual arrangements to identify its performance obligations. A performance obligation is a promise in a contract to transfer a distinct good or service to the customer. The majority of the Company’s contracts have a single performance obligation because the promise to transfer the individual good or service is not separately identifiable from other promises within the contract and is therefore not distinct. Some of the Company’s contracts have multiple performance obligations, primarily related to the provision of multiple goods or services. For contracts with more than one performance obligation, the Company allocates the total transaction price in an amount based on the estimated relative standalone selling prices underlying each performance obligation.

 

The Company recognizes revenue from continuing operations primarily from the following sources:

 

In-person revenue

 

The Company’s in-person revenue is comprised of event revenue, sponsorship revenue, merchandising revenue and other revenue. Event revenue is generated through Allied Esports events held at the Company’s esports properties. Event revenues recognized from the rental of the Allied Esports arena and gaming trucks are recognized at a point in time when the event occurs. In-person revenue also includes revenue from ticket sales, admission fees and food and beverage sales for events held at the Company’s esports properties. Ticket revenue is recognized at the completion of the applicable event. Point of sale revenues, such as food and beverage, gaming and merchandising revenues, are recognized when control of the related goods are transferred to the customer.

 

The Company also generates sponsorship revenues for naming rights for, and rental of, the Company’s arena and gaming trucks. Sponsorship revenues from naming rights of the Company’s esports arena and from sponsorship arrangements are recognized on a straight-line basis over the contractual term of the agreement. The Company records deferred revenue to the extent that payment has been received for services that have yet to be performed.

 

In-person revenue was comprised of the following for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

    For the Years Ended  
    December 31,  
    2020     2019  
Event revenue   $ 574,536     $ 3,544,868  
Sponsorship revenue     1,730,198       2,081,029  
Food and beverage revenue     310,826       1,158,004  
Ticket and gaming revenue     349,526       543,204  
Merchandising revenue     22,209       171,014  
Other revenue     1,068       244  
Total in-person revenue   $ 2,988,363     $ 7,498,363  

Multiplatform revenue

 

The Company’s multiplatform content revenue is comprised of distribution revenue and content revenue. Distribution revenue is generated primarily through the distribution of content to online channels. Any advertising revenue earned by online channel is shared with the Company. The Company recognizes online advertising revenue at the point in time when the advertisements are placed in the video content.

 

Multiplatform revenue was comprised of the following for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019:

 

    For the Years Ended  
    December 31,  
    2020     2019  
Distribution revenue   $ 222,442     $
-
 
Content revenue    
-
      50,000  
Total multiplatform revenue   $ 222,442     $ 50,000  

 

The following table summarizes our revenue recognized under ASC 606 in our consolidated statements of operations:

 

    For the Years Ended  
    December 31,  
    2020     2019  
Revenues Recognized at a Point in Time:                
Event revenue   $ 574,536     $ 3,544,868  
Distribution revenue     222,442      
-
 
Food and beverage revenue     310,826       1,158,004  
Ticket and gaming revenue     349,526       543,204  
Merchandising revenue     22,209       171,014  
Content revenue    
-
      50,000  
Other revenue     1,068       244  
Total Revenues Recognized at a Point in Time     1,480,607       5,467,334  
                 
Revenues Recognized Over a Period of Time:                
Sponsorship revenue     1,730,198       2,081,029  
Total Revenues Recognized Over a Period of Time     1,730,198       2,081,029  
Total Revenues   $ 3,210,805     $ 7,548,363  

 

The timing of the Company’s revenue recognition may differ from the timing of payment by its customers. A receivable is recorded when revenue is recognized prior to payment and the Company has an unconditional right to payment. Alternatively, when payment precedes the provision of the related services, the Company records deferred revenue until the performance obligations are satisfied.

 

As of December 31, 2020, all continuing operations’ performance obligations in connection with contract liabilities included within deferred revenue on the prior year consolidated balance sheet have been satisfied. The Company expects to satisfy the remaining performance obligations related to its December 31, 2020 deferred revenue balance within the next twelve months. During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, there was no revenue recognized from performance obligations satisfied (or partially satisfied) in previous periods.

 

Stock-Based Compensation

 

The Company measures the cost of services received in exchange for an award of equity instruments based on the fair value of the award on the date of grant. The fair value amount is then recognized over the period during which services are required to be provided in exchange for the award, usually the vesting period. The estimation of stock-based awards that will ultimately vest requires judgment, and to the extent actual results or updated estimates differ from original estimates, such amounts are recorded as a cumulative adjustment in the period that the estimates are revised. The Company accounts for forfeitures as they occur.

 

Advertising Costs

 

Advertising costs from continuing operations are charged to operations in the year incurred and totaled $97,840 and $470,746 for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively.

 

Concentration Risks

 

Financial instruments that potentially subject the Company to concentration of credit risk consist of cash accounts in a financial institution which, at times, may exceed Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (“FDIC”) insured limits. The Company has not experienced any losses in such accounts, periodically evaluates the creditworthiness of the financial institutions and has determined the credit exposure to be negligible.

 

During the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, 10% and 11%, respectively, of the Company’s revenues from continuing operations were from customers in foreign countries.

 

During the year ended December 31, 2020, the Company’s two largest customers accounted for 41% and 13% of the Company’s consolidated revenues from continuing operations. During the year ended December 31, 2019, the Company’s largest customer accounted for 14% of the Company’s consolidated revenues from continuing operations.

 

As of December 31, 2020, a single customer represented 74% of the Company’s accounts receivable from continuing operations.

 

Foreign Currency Translation

 

The Company’s reporting currency is the United States Dollar. The functional currencies of the Company’s operating subsidiaries are their local currencies (United States Dollar and Euro). Euro-denominated assets and liabilities are translated into the United States Dollar using the exchange rate at the balance sheet date (1.2264 and 1.1215 at December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively), and revenue and expense accounts are translated using the weighted average exchange rate in effect for the period (1.1414 and 1.1194 for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively). Resulting translation adjustments are made directly to accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income. Losses of $0 and $14,941 arising from exchange rate fluctuations on transactions denominated in a currency other than the reporting currency for the years ended December 31, 2020 and 2019, respectively, are recognized in operating results in the consolidated statements of operations. The Company engages in foreign currency denominated transactions with customers and suppliers, as well as between subsidiaries with different functional currencies.

 

Subsequent Events

 

The Company evaluates events that have occurred after the balance sheet date but before the financial statements are issued. Based upon the evaluation, the Company did not identify any recognized or non-recognized subsequent events that would have required adjustment or disclosure in the consolidated financial statements, except as disclosed.

 

CARES Act

 

On March 27, 2020, President Trump signed into law the Coronavirus Aid, Relief and Economic Security Act (“CARES Act”). The CARES Act, amongst other things, includes provisions relating to refundable payroll tax credits, deferment of employer social security payments, net operating loss carryback periods, alternative minimum tax credit refunds, modifications to the net interest deduction limitations and technical corrections to tax depreciation methods for qualified improvement property. Pursuant to Accounting Standards Codification Topic (“ASC 740”), the Company recognizes the tax effects of new tax legislation upon enactment. Accordingly, the CARES Act was effective beginning in the quarter ended March 31, 2020. The Company does not believe that the new tax provisions outlined in the CARES Act will have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements.

 

Discontinued Operations

 

The assets and liabilities of WPT are classified as “held for sale” as of December 31, 2021 and are reflected in the accompanying Consolidated Balance Sheets as “Current assets of discontinued operations,” “Assets of discontinued operations – non-current,” “Current liabilities of discontinued operations” and “Liabilities of discontinued operations – non-current.” The results of operations of WPT are included in “Income (loss) from discontinued operations, net of tax provision” in the accompanying Consolidated Statements of Operations and Comprehensive Loss. For comparative purposes, all prior periods presented have been reclassified to reflect the classifications on a consistent basis.

 

Reclassifications

 

Certain prior year balances have been reclassified in order to conform to current year presentation. These reclassifications have no effect on previously reported results of operations or loss per share.

 

Recently Issued Accounting Pronouncements

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued Accounting Standards Update (“ASU”) 2016-02, “Leases (Topic 842).” ASU 2016-02 requires that a lessee recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from operating leases. A lessee should recognize in the statement of financial position a liability to make lease payments (the lease liability) and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. For leases with a term of 12 months or less, a lessee is permitted to make an accounting policy election by class of underlying asset not to recognize lease assets and lease liabilities. In transition, lessees and lessors are required to recognize and measure leases at the beginning of the earliest period presented using a modified retrospective approach. This amendment will be effective for private companies and emerging growth companies for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2021, and interim periods within fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. The FASB issued ASU No. 2018-10 “Codification Improvements to Topic 842, Leases” and ASU No. 2018-11 “Leases (Topic 842) Targeted Improvements” in July 2018, and ASU No. 2018-20 “Leases (Topic 842) - Narrow Scope Improvements for Lessors” in December 2018. ASU 2018-10 and ASU 2018-20 provide certain amendments that affect narrow aspects of the guidance issued in ASU 2016-02. ASU 2018-11 allows all entities adopting ASU 2016-02 to choose an additional (and optional) transition method of adoption, under which an entity initially applies the new leases standard at the adoption date and recognizes a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings in the period of adoption. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that this guidance will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-13 “Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326)” and also issued subsequent amendments to the initial guidance under ASU 2018-19, ASU 2019-04 and ASU 2019-05 (collectively Topic 326). Topic 326 requires the measurement and recognition of expected credit losses for financial assets held at amortized cost. This replaces the existing incurred loss model with an expected loss model and requires the use of forward-looking information to calculate credit loss estimates. The Company will be required to adopt the provisions of this ASU on January 1, 2023, with early adoption permitted for certain amendments. Topic 326 must be adopted by applying a cumulative effect adjustment to retained earnings. The adoption of Topic 326 is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

 

In March 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-02, which aligns the accounting for production costs of episodic television series with the accounting for production costs of films. In addition, ASU 2019-02 modifies certain aspects of the capitalization, impairment, presentation and disclosure requirements in Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 926-20 and the impairment, presentation and disclosure requirements in ASC 920-350. This ASU must be adopted on a prospective basis and is effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2020, including interim periods within those years, with early adoption permitted. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that this pronouncement will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In February 2020, the FASB issued ASU No. 2020-02, Financial Instruments - Credit Losses (Topic 326) and Leases (Topic 842) – Amendments to SEC Paragraphs Pursuant to SEC Staff Accounting Bulletin No. 119 and Update to SEC Section on Effective Date (“ASU 2020-02”) which provides clarifying guidance and minor updates to ASU No. 2016-13 – Financial Instruments – Credit Loss (Topic 326) (“ASU 2016-13”) and related to ASU No. 2016-02 - Leases (Topic 842). ASU 2020-02 amends the effective date of ASU 2016-13, such that ASU 2016-13 and its amendments will be effective for the Company for interim and annual periods in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. The adoption of ASU 2016-13 is not expected to have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

 

In August 2020, the FASB issued ASU 2020-06, Debt—Debt with Conversion and Other Options (Subtopic 470-20) and Derivatives and Hedging— Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (Subtopic 815-40): Accounting for Convertible Instruments and Contracts in an Entity’s Own Equity, to clarify the accounting for certain financial instruments with characteristics of liabilities and equity. The amendments in this update reduce the number of accounting models for convertible debt instruments and convertible preferred stock by removing the cash conversion model and the beneficial conversion feature model. Limiting the accounting models will result in fewer embedded conversion features being separately recognized from the host contract. Convertible instruments that continue to be subject to separation models are (1) those with embedded conversion features that are not clearly and closely related to the host contract, that meet the definition of a derivative, and that do not qualify for a scope exception from derivative accounting and (2) convertible debt instruments issued with substantial premiums for which the premiums are recorded as paid-in-capital. In addition, this ASU improves disclosure requirements for convertible instruments and earnings-per-share guidance. The ASU also revises the derivative scope exception guidance to reduce form-over-substance-based accounting conclusions driven by remote contingent events. The amendments in this update are effective for the Company in fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2023, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption will be permitted, but no earlier than for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2020. The Company is currently evaluating the impact that this guidance will have on its consolidated financial statements.

 

Recently Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

 

In January 2017, the FASB issued ASU No. 2017-04, Intangibles – Goodwill and Other (Topic 350): Simplifying the Test for Goodwill Impairment. The new guidance simplifies the accounting for goodwill impairment by eliminating Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test. Under current guidance, Step 2 of the goodwill impairment test requires entities to calculate the implied fair value of goodwill in the same manner as the amount of goodwill recognized in a business combination by assigning the fair value of a reporting unit to all of the assets and liabilities of the reporting unit. The carrying value in excess of the implied fair value is recognized as goodwill impairment. Under the new standard, goodwill impairment is recognized based on Step 1 of the current guidance, which calculates the carrying value in excess of the reporting unit’s fair value. This standard was adopted on January 1, 2020 and did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

 

In July 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-09, “Codification Improvements” (“ASU 2018-09”). These amendments provide clarifications and corrections to certain ASC subtopics including the following: Income Statement - Reporting Comprehensive Income – Overall (Topic 220-10), Debt - Modifications and Extinguishments (Topic 470-50), Distinguishing Liabilities from Equity – Overall (Topic 480-10), Compensation - Stock Compensation - Income Taxes (Topic 718-740), Business Combinations – Income Taxes (Topic 805-740), Derivatives and Hedging – Overall (Topic 815-10), and Fair Value Measurement – Overall (Topic 820-10). The majority of the amendments in ASU 2018-09 will be effective in annual periods beginning after December 15, 2019. This standard was adopted on January 1, 2020 and did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

 

In August 2018, the FASB issued ASU No. 2018-13, “Fair Value Measurement (Topic 820): Disclosure Framework—Changes to the Disclosure Requirements for Fair Value Measurement” (“ASU 2018-13”). The amendments in ASU 2018-13 modify the disclosure requirements associated with fair value measurements based on the concepts in the Concepts Statement, including the consideration of costs and benefits. The amendments on changes in unrealized gains and losses, the range and weighted average of significant unobservable inputs used to develop Level 3 fair value measurements, and the narrative description of measurement uncertainty should be applied prospectively for only the most recent interim or annual period presented in the initial fiscal year of adoption. All other amendments should be applied retrospectively to all periods presented upon their effective date. The amendments are effective for all entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2019, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted, including adoption in an interim period. This standard was adopted on January 1, 2020 and did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or disclosures.

 

In December 2019, the FASB issued ASU 2019-12, Income Taxes – Simplifying the Accounting for Income Taxes. The new guidance simplifies the accounting for income taxes by removing several exceptions in the current standard and adding guidance to reduce complexity in certain areas, such as requiring that an entity reflect the effect of an enacted change in tax laws or rates in the annual effective tax rate computation in the interim period that includes the enactment date. The new standard is effective for fiscal years, and interim periods within those fiscal years, beginning after December 15, 2020, with early adoption permitted. The Company early adopted this standard on October 1, 2020 and it did not have a material impact on the Company’s consolidated financial statements or disclosures.